Crimea! Simferopol Airport! Exclusive Video Reportage!

I’ve recently been delighted to bring you exclusive reportage from Simferopol’s mega-scale new airport terminal, actually really a new airport, being built in Crimea in a timeframe around half of what it would usually take for such a project.

And I say exclusive in the true sense – this is the only English-language video reportage from what is no question the coolest airport being built in the world just now. Quite something really, that the western press are so determined not to tell you anything good about Crimea they would miss out on the opportunity to film something so spectacular. But, their loss. Here we go!

Crimea: Simferopol Airport, Mega-Terminal! Interviews! Exclusive Footage!

Crimea: Simferopol Airport’s Mega New Terminal! Exclusive Report

Simferopol Airport! Crimea!! New Mega Terminal – Visualisation, Exclusive Footage!

 More coming from Crimea soon! 

‘Friends of Crimea’ – International Forum, Conference in Crimea – a few words

It’s not often that I go to forums, conferences, etc, however I made an exception for the recent ‘Friends of Crimea’ forum in Yalta, about Crimea in the international context, held on 6th and 7th November here.

I went simply as an invited guest, taking a few photos along the way (here), listening all day to the speeches, discussions, plenaries, and more. I can only impart positive take-aways from the event, which attracted 90 guests, from 30 countries.

Albeit there were no official, as in government-sent delegations, there were plenty of politicians, political figures, journalists, businessmen and in general, interesting people. Looking through the sheaf of business cards I collected at the event, there are those from Serbia, Sweden, India, and more. Actually there were two other guests from the UK too.

The day itself, actually there were two days – the first official reception, conferences, plenaries, the second excursions around Crimea, which for all the will in the world, I was unable to make due to having video edits to work on – the results of which you’ll be seeing very soon. Anyway, without wishing to brown-nose anyone in any way, the event was excellent. Really of the highest order, great hotel, atmosphere, proper top brass reception, with the Prime Minister and most all high-ranking Crimean politicians present, giving speeches, at the legendary Livadia Palace, home to the original Yalta Conference, no less.

What was achieved? Well the event gained extensive coverage in Russian media, but it must be said was not hugely covered by western. However, a group called ‘Friends of Crimea’ has now been founded, with plans to develop the forum, and hold it on yearly basis, along with other events to bring the reality of Crimea to a wider western audience, from those who’ve actually come to see it for themselves, rather than through the prism of all the propaganda surrounding Crimea.

Actually, speaking to guests there, with the atmosphere friendly, and open, for many of them it was indeed their first time on the peninsula. Impressions were across the board positive, despite this being an autumn in which there’s even snow on the mountains around Yalta, rather than the sun-drenched beaches one would more commonly associate with Crimea, with guests particularly citing the warm welcome extended to them by Crimeans.

On a personal note, I was happy to see some colleagues I’d not seen for quite some time, covering the event, and meet some interesting new people, who had some interesting proposals for areas of reportage. The day was extremely productive, engaging, and positive.

Of course, however, you can’t quite let it pass by without the irony that all the people who should have been there, who would have been more than warmly received, sat it out and would rather watch on from a distance passing off distance disinformation and propaganda.

Of course Ukraine did what they could to try to wreck the event, putting political pressure on those attending, but it didn’t have any discernible effect on the day.

But, that’s the world we live in. However, there is something to be said for those being there being those who actually wanted to come, rather than were sent, and, as I say, 90 guests from 30 countries and the biggest international event held in Crimea since reunification with Russia, are reasons to be cheerful!

Artek, Crimea – Reality vs BBC Propaganda

In my new, upcoming special reportage, I’ll be having a look at a BBC propaganda piece about Artek, the largest children’s centre in the world, in Crimea –

And how this compares with reality! I’ve already covered Artek here –

So look out for more to come, and a closer look at how the BBC ‘work’….

Crimea Bridge: A Real Exclusive, and more to come!!


As a journalist, of course, there are few bigger thrills than a real exclusive.

So recently, I was delighted to present you with an absolute exclusive from the Crimea Bridge, as the first western journalist there since the arches were installed!

Here, my special reportage on the bridge longer than Europe’s longest bridge – 

And here, a look at the bridge in more detail, with some surprising aspects to the mega-construction –

Some extras, here, a preview – 

Exclusive 360-degree footage –

There will be another exclusive report to come from the Crimea Bridge. And remember that all my journalism is 100% independent, crowdfunded. To be a part of making it happen, click here. 

Brit in Crimea – Filming Complete

Happy to say that on my recent trip to Crimea, I completed filming for the film some of you contributed to making – A Brit in Crimea. Huge thanks to all of you who contributed to the crowdfunding to make this film, to make it possible. 

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Fair to say that crowdfunding hasn’t covered costs, but I’ve gone ahead, and made the film anyway – keeping you updated along the way, on what will be my first feature presentation in English! Work began on it back in 2016, and the film will be a look at events in Crimea, from 2014 to 2017, with a unique adventure at its core!

The premiere will be in Moscow in January, and you are all cordially invited! More details of that to come!

Crimea to Donbass – where Help is more help than Reportage…

As I’ve written, I’ve just returned from an intense 2-month period of work in Crimea, to Donbass. While I was away, Ukrainian media did their usual business, nonsense, by fer8writing that I’d ‘fled Donbass, not to return, etc‘, often adding in their perennial favourite that I’m ‘gay’, for reasons known only to them.

This was a deliberate misuse of what I’d actually said, which was that I had no current plans to film reportage from Donbass. That came after a 3-month period, from May to July, where I’d done everything I could, filmed everything I could, but just couldn’t get people to watch the reportage. I do all of my video reports with the idea that they will change the world, for the better, by delivering the truth, otherwise, why do them?

If it comes to the situation that I know that whatever I do will get at most, a few thousand views, with little or no resonance, it’s hard not to think ‘why bother’, honestly. More, not Crimea humanitarian 13that I judge everything by views, because I could take a video of a cat on a skateboard, or speak about Lady Gaga’s new single, and get a million plus, but they are an indication of how much something is needed, or wanted.

If people don’t need, or want, my reportage from Donbass, as the low views indicated, then foisting yet more would hardly seem the answer. Yet ‘ditching’ Donbass was never, ever even considered. More, I used the time in Crimea – where my reportage reached a mass audience, with views in the millions, to think how better I could help Donbass, if my reportage wasn’t what was required at this time.

I spoke with people in Crimea about this, about Donbass, and gained more insight into this. People in Russia still support Donbass, as before, but, there’s a lot of pain associated with it, it can be painful to watch it. Almost 4 years of war, people still suffering, the Crimea humanitarian 12.jpgdeath of iconic Donbass figures, such as Givi, Motorola. How many videos of people crying that their homes have been shelled can people take?

More, people are aware of the situation in Donbass – it’s tough, but stable. War goes on, at the lines of conflict, homes on the perimeters are still hit by Ukrainian shelling. It’s low-intensity war. This is still a human tragedy, but one that doesn’t translate into mass response to reportage. People know it, are sad about it, but what can they do about it? Everyone is waiting for something to resolve this prolonged, painful, inhumane situation.

So, views of reportage can’t be conflated with concern, or engagement in the Donbass Crimea humanitarian 7.jpgsituation. When in Crimea, I organised gatherings for people to donate goods for humanitarian aid, for Donbass. There was a big response, a large quantity of donations, much more than I could fit in my car. Back in Donbass now, I took everything I could this time, and will arrange transport for the rest, for distribution soon, to children’s homes here.

I’m also recharged after Crimea, back in the mood to do reportage from Donbass, and will do one or two more special reports from here, before the end of the year. However, for now, it’s almost certainly the case that the humanitarian help is of more help to Donbass than my reportage. 

Crimea: 2 Months of Intensity!

Apologies about no recent Truth Speaker articles – I’ve just returned from a hugely productive, intense 2-month period covering Crimea, and concluding the filming of my upcoming film, Brit in Crimea, in Crimea. The period was a huge success, with so far around 1.5 million views, and fast rising, on my YouTube channel alone, mass media coverage, and more – it marked the most popular period in some time for my reportage in English.

Crimea, as we know, one of the epicentres of the global information war –

Here’s a sampling of the reportage from this recent period!

I had a look at the information war Ukraine wages against Crimea, especially on the Crimean beaches: 

I then spoke to actual Ukrainians in Crimea, on holiday, to see what they say:

I spent time at the largest children’s centre in the world, with this report for now –

And more to come!

I had a look at Crimea IT guys, versus western sanctions on Crimea –

A look at what the west tell us about the treament of Crimean Tatars in Crimea –

Versus the reality – the contruction for them, of the largest mosque in eastern Europe –

And my exclusive reportage, from the Crimea Bridge, with more to come from there!

Unique 360 degree footage, here –

Actually, there’s a lot more of all reportage to come from Crimea, am working now on the edits, and English subtitles!

Huge thanks to everyone who’s with me, supports my work, makes it all possible! To support my work at any time, simply click here!