Crimea, Russia and to Rage against the UK Propaganda Machine

Graham Phillips

I’ve been back in the UK for over a month now, and in that time, I’ve come to understand a few things better, especially the meaning of Orwell’s phrase that the future is ‘a boot stamping on a human face forever’.

But that’s hardly where the Orwell references end. Because in the UK it’s works a truly Orwellian-style propaganda machine, designed to keep the populace in eternal suspension of the purported threat of, of course – Russia! 

There’s Boris Johnson over in Kiev, churning out an incessant slew of anti-Russian rhetoric, without any substance to back it up, but because it’s anti-Russian, it’ll naturally be accepted unquestioned:

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What we do have, of course, is Boris meeting ‘Crimean Tatars’ and condemning Russia’s ‘illegal annexation‘ of Crimea…

screenshot-1307Yet this provided without any context whatsoever. Russia’s ‘illegal annexation‘ of Crimea came about after a referendum there, which came about after a violent overthrow of government in Ukraine, Euromaidan. Yet, Euromaidan is exalted in the UK, events at eminent establishments are held in its honour, and dissenting from the narrative is not condoned –

Euromaidan is so important because the whole house of cards rests on it. It must be purported that Euromaidan was good. Because then it can be sustained that Crimea, and Donbass, are ‘bad’, and ‘Russian aggression’. And the situation in Crimea must be made out to be ‘bad’ (as it always is), with particular focus on the Crimean Tatars and their supposed repression.

In the above Crimean Tatar photo, it looks like Crimean Tatar figure Mustafa Dzhemilev, self-appointed ‘leader of Crimean Tatars‘, who supported Euromaidan tatarsin Crimea, left in 2014 for Kiev, and has provided an endless source for western media of reports of repression, persecution etc against Crimean Tatars in Crimea, despite himself not having been there for some 3 years now.

In Crimea, some are puzzled why Dzhemilev has never attempted to return to the peninsula, most accept that he has found a lucrative stream in Kiev, endlessly reciting how ‘repressed’ his people are, to eager audiences who ensure he is well remunerated for his suffering.

Yet in Crimea, Dzhemilev is regarded by most Crimean Tatars as a traitor to his own people:

And, as here, my reportage, while you can find Crimean Tatars who will tell you they preferred life under Ukraine, they are in the minority, and more, feel free to express that opinion:

But, none of this must be allowed to reach mainstream media. There, it can only be a wall of ‘blame Russia’, that’s become so much of a meme the Russian Embassy in the UK regularly joke about it –

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What are the Ukrainian Embassy doing, meanwhile? Pumping out a relentless stream of tweets blaming Russia for everything…

screenshot-990screenshot-1258
screenshot-1264screenshot-1252And they are fully supported by the UK in doing this, the UK’s own embassy ever happy to tweet, retweet anything, as long as it’s pro-Ukrainian, and by default, anti-Russian. Ukraine really is an incredibly convenient country for those looking for a stick with which to beat Russia, so much so that all are willing to turn a blind eye to the manifest problems with, and in, Ukraine –

And when it’s not Ukraine, there’s always a subculture of Russia which can be passed off as Russia, look at Reggie Yates’ recent ‘yoof’ style series on BBC, Extreme Russia, simply a chance to go round exposing all that’s bad about the country, safe in the knowledge that no one over here will either disagree, or seek to present the other side.

So, that’s the reality as we have it, walls, and waves of anti-Russian propaganda. And nowhere’s safe, not even sport, this is how the BBC are portraying the upcoming World Cup in Russia:

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Of course there are those in the UK who can see behind the lies, and the masks, to the truth. But you have to really want to. You are faced with a colossal propaganda machine in the UK, to lie down is to let it simply stamp all over you. To stand against it, you have to be be prepared to, as things are now, stand almost alone.

Request for Assistance: Translate new Video Reportage about Journalism in Ukraine

I’d love to have this new reportage, about journalism in Ukraine pre and post Euromaidan, in as many languages as possible!

Can you help? Write in the subtitles, add in the comments section here.

Thanks again! Graham

Important New ‘Truth about’ Series… and you can be involved…

Graham Phillips

I’m always looking for ways to get the truth out to as wide an audience as possible. English and Russian cover a lot of the world, but not nearly all. Many people are still coming to the situation in Donbass not knowing much about it at all.

So, after attending a recent LSE propaganda seminar, I made this video, an introduction to Euromaidan, in English:

The format is effective, and can be put into a number of languages. Actually here, I asked your help in doing just that, and have already had several responses. The video is already up in Italian, with much more to come.

So, watch out for much more of that to come, and be sure I’ll be asking for your help, and input, along the way!

Very best, Graham

Request for Assistance: Translate this Text about Euromaidan for me

I’d like to have my Euromaidan video in as many languages as possible. If you can translate this for me, into any language, please add text below!

Thanks again! Graham

This is in response to the recent panel discussion on Maidan, glorifying Maidan, as part of the LSE Literary Festival…

I’m a freelance British journalist, who lived happily in the beautiful country of Ukraine, for 2 years, before Euromaidan… My photos here.

In early 2014, I went to spend night and day on Maidan myself, to see what it was all about…

Dirty tents, men in masks, masses of litter… Maidan was messy, it stank.

A lot of the people there were clearly, vagrants…

Or honestly, just… weirdos.

… alcoholics…

… mentally ill, masked..

… fans of Nazi collaborator Stepan Bandera.

Neo-Nazis.

Ready for violence…

… looking for violence.

Occupied civic buildings, posters of neo-Nazi party Svoboda, and Bandera…

… masses of armed thugs.

… policemen protecting themselves with shields…

… Maidan protesters throwing everything at them…

… projectiles raining down on police.

… chaos, anarchy…

… sometimes protesters would target not the police, but press…

… crazy people…

Terrorism.

That was Euromaidan.

The Truth about Euromaidan vs LSE Propaganda

I’ll be doing video reportage on the subject this week, as yesterday I attended a panel discussion organised by the London School of Economics, LSE, as part of their literary festival. The topic was Euromaidan, and I went along with an open mind (as I also went to Euromaidan itself), ready to listen, sitting for over half an hour…

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And all I heard from the panellists, featuring most notably Euromaidan activist Mustafa Nayeem, was one pro-Euromaidan account after another. And it became clear, this event wasn’t going to be a real discussion on Maidan at all. It was simply a Euromaidan propaganda seminar.

So, I decided to ask the panellists some questions myself, what happened?

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Consternation in the panel, uproar from the pro-Euromaidan element of the audience, who had clearly gone along to hear just the above propaganda –

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And I was quickly kicked out.

My question had been quite simple, how can they, at a respected London Institution, pass off a propaganda event as part of a literary festival? Where was the mention of what I saw on Euromaidan – terrorism?

More to come, for now, this is Euromaidan as I remember it – the truth about Euromaidan –

Slavyansk – Donbass – 2 Years after Ukrainian Forces Took It Back

Graham Phillips

Ukraine’s president Poroshenko is in Donbass just now, 2 years after Ukrainian forces recaptured Slavyansk, Kramatorsk, and further territory in the area. It’s, thus far, business as usual for the man now more than 2 years Ukraine’s president despite approval ratings actually lower than his predecessor at the time of the Euromaidan overthrow – around 17%.

So, we have Poroshenko decked out in camouflage, making a series of
Poroshenko SlavyanskStrangelove-esque statements, giving out medals, posing for flinty photos in forementioned fatigues, making an announcement on changing the insignia on Ukrainian military uniforms to honour Ukraine’s Insurgent Army, who fought with the Nazis in WWII.

Business as usual then, the standard greetings, congratulations on ‘liberation’, further plaudits to Ukrainians for standing up in ‘defence of freedom, democracy and territorial integrity’. Here it gets a bit tendentious, because what actually kicked off the situation in Slavyansk was Euromaidan in Kiev – a mob taking to the streets, backed on by a baying crowd pumped up by partisan media coverage, a western blind eye to any acts of violence perpetrated, and generous foreign funding. 

LuganskApril2014On April 12th, as had happened in Kiev – but the western media approved of it thereanti-Kiev activists took over administrative buildings in the city. At that time I was in Lugansk (pictured), having accepted a week’s work for RT (Russia Today). Why RT? My position in not supporting Euromaidan meant Russian media was the only door open to me, which allowed me to report things as I saw them. Now, having not worked with RT for almost 2 years, can say I neither watch nor even like the channel, but back then, they gave me the opportunity in Donbass.

So, I was there with them in Lugansk, when things started going off in Slavyansk, and I demanded to go there. Initially, to be honest, the producer at RT that day hadn’t even heard of Slavyansk, so was against it. But, I persisted, went, stayed there reporting for the next month-and-a-half until my capture on May 20th by Ukrainian forces at Mariupol, and deportation – although in the first instance, it must be said, Kiev made me deport myself telling me to ‘get on a plane tomorrow if you ever want to come back to Ukraine‘.

In my time in Slavyansk, I recall the vast majority of the population supporting the DPR, many local men joining the ‘people’s militia’ – it’s actually more natural to call them ‘opolchenie‘, the Russian word, as there’s no direct translation which captures that word. I’d love to show you videos of this, however due to the hunt for ‘separatists’ which took place after Ukraine retook the city, I had to remove most of my (hundreds of) videos. You can see one here, in which I’ve blurred the faces, a crowd of locals chanting for ‘referendum’ in the city centre, mid-April.

However, there’s no question that things got a bit messy, and there were a few who exploited the opportunity, in the chaos, to do as they will. The fallout between the ‘people’s mayor’ Vyacheslav Ponomarev and military commander, Igor Strelkov turned very ugly, and as the weeks passed it became clear to residents there would be no repeat of what had happened in Crimea a couple of months before (referendum, Russia immediately taking over).

Screenshot (46)The referendum held in Slavyansk, on May 11th 2014, saw western media sneering at a ‘farce’, focusing on a ridiculous, clearly Kiev-planted story of 100,000 pre-marked ballot papers ‘intercepted’, rather than paying attention to the mass turnout of people from the city, with queues of hundreds of metres, plenty of normal ballot papers to see.

And Ukrainian military actions had in any case begun in April, I saw the first body there on May 3rd, a man shot by Ukrainian soldiers after a dispute, was present at many locationshospitals, to confirm figures, and funerals. By the time I was deported, in later May, already up to 30 civilians had been killed as a result of Ukrainian military action. How many were killed overall, before Ukrainian forces took the city of some 115,000 back, in early July 2014? At least another 30, by any estimation – sources here, here, here, here – other than the forgiving official version, which puts the total figure killed at below 20. 

So when Poroshenko writes today, of Ukrainian forces taking the city with ‘minimal human losses‘ and ‘saving the lives of people‘, that’s clearly untrue. By the time the Ukrainians retook the city, their military campaign, against a vastly outnumbered opolchenie, had seen a place which once attracted tourists to its beaches, reduced to destitution, subsisting most of the time without water, power, extensively damaged by Ukrainian shelling.

Here’, a children’s hospital shelled – 30th May 2014 –

Orphanage – 1st June 2014 –

Smoke rising from city – 6th June 2014 –

Queue for water – 8th June –

Building goes up in flames after shelling hit – 8th June –

Wrecked apartment block – 12th June –

Many inbetween, but here 30th June, as in the days before they retook the city, Ukraine’s shelling campaign intensified –

Of course, Poroshenko today wrote about it, again, as a victory ‘against Russia’. Nonsense. There were volunteer fighters from Russia, it’s entirely possible there was some hardware which had come over the border, but most of the fighters were local men who had dug up weapons from Soviet times, hunting rifles. True opolchenie, most of the military vehicles captured Ukrainian army AFV’s and on. You can see some of both here, in this video of Victory Day, 2014 –

So, when the opolchenie retreated, and Ukrainian forces swept in in a carefully co-ordinated campaign on July 6th, which involved much filmed handing out of bread and vegetables, there was indeed a beleaguered turnout of townsfolk to meet them, some there for the handout, others genuinely happy that Ukraine had taken back control.

But did it reflect the will of most in Slavyansk? From my time there, I’d say that Strelkov Slavyanskcertainly wasn’t the case. In the beginning, a clear majority of people in the city supported the would-be breakaway Donetsk People’s Republic, of which Slavyansk was a part, perhaps 80-90%. As time went on, this went down, due to the conduct of Ponomarev, and Strelkov – the latter (pictured), having decided it was a war situation, meaning war regime, meaning shooting people for looting and other such acts. But, still, support for the DPR remained high, perhaps 60-70% when Ukraine took over.

Actually, this man here I interviewed in a surreal Slavyansk in later July 2014, with Ukraine’s takeover having quickly morphed into organised hunts for ‘separatists’, seeing disappearances, said that while he’d not supported the DPR – in fact everyone suddenly ‘hadn’t supported the DPR, had been out of town’ – around 70% had.

This woman I interviewed at the same time, mid-July 2014, was, pretty radically, pro-Ukrainian, and there always were some like her. However, it was a minority.

So, what’s Slavyansk like now? Well, a city divided, united by something – no one’s happy. Few jobs, little money, a city entirely re-branded to enforce Ukrainianism on everyone – Ukrainian flags and banners everywhere, organised pro-Ukrainian meetings, parades, pressure to speak the Ukrainian language (in a city which spoke almost entirely Russian before). I have friends there who keep me abreast, and more, even filmed a report from there recently –

How much DPR support is there now? Well, it’s hard to be sure exactly. Round-ups and repression have had an impact. Many had to leave town, others disappeared. Others, pro-Ukrainians, have been settled there from other areas of Ukraine. Yet many remain, pro-DPR, of course unable to express this (for the above video, many pro-DPR simply refused to speak). Relentless Ukrainian On 27 April 2016, (right) UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Orlando Bloom visits with pupils of School #13 in Slovyansk, as part of a visit to conflict-hit eastern Ukraine. He was in the country to raise awareness of the global education crisis facing children in emergencies. UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Orlando Bloom visits School #13 in Slovyansk as part of a visit to conflict-hit eastern Ukraine to raise awareness of the global education crisis facing children in emergencies. School #13 was one of the first hit by shelling in the conflict that broke out more than 2 years ago. It is one of the 57 schools that UNICEF has helped to repair and refurbish in the region. UNICEF provided new school furniture, lego for classrooms, games and trained the school psychologist to help children cope with their experiences. Across the conflict area, approximately 580,000 children are in urgent need of aid and more than 230,000 children have been forced from their homes. Around one in five schools and kindergartens in the region have been damaged or destroyed and around 300,000 children are in immediate need of assistance to continue their education. The trip came as new findings show that nearly a quarter of the world's school-aged children - 462 million - now live in countries affected by crisis. The Education Cannot Wait Proposal, written by the Overseas Development Institute and commissioned by a range of partners including UNICEF, reveals that nearly than one in six – or 75 million – children from pre-primary to upper-secondary age (3-18) living in nations affected by crises is classed as being in desperate need of educational support. However, on average, only two per cent of global humanitarian appeals is dedicated to education. At the very first World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul in less than three weeks’ time, a groundbreaking new fund - Education Cannot Wait - will be launched to give access to learning to every child in need in emergencies. It aims to raispropaganda – and the Ukrainian media is so propagandistic a journalist called Anatoliy Shariy has made a career catching them out – has had its effect. Some changed sides, turned on neighbours, informed on neighbours.

There’s been limited repairing of damage caused by shelling. Occasional stage-managed operations such as the visit of Orlando Bloom (pictured above) barely paper over the cracks.

There’s an uncertainty about what comes next. When Poroshenko and the PR bandwagon rolled out today, they left a scarred city behind them, the pain of war still deeply rended in buildings and populace. The overwhelming appetite is, understandably, for there to be no war, and many who support the DPR are even willing to tolerate Ukrainian occupancy if it means no war. But, beyond the demagogic, tubthumping tweets of Poroshenko, 2 years on from the Ukrainian takeover, lies a city in a bleak state with few reasons to be cheerful.