Crimea! Simferopol Airport! Exclusive Video Reportage!

I’ve recently been delighted to bring you exclusive reportage from Simferopol’s mega-scale new airport terminal, actually really a new airport, being built in Crimea in a timeframe around half of what it would usually take for such a project.

And I say exclusive in the true sense – this is the only English-language video reportage from what is no question the coolest airport being built in the world just now. Quite something really, that the western press are so determined not to tell you anything good about Crimea they would miss out on the opportunity to film something so spectacular. But, their loss. Here we go!

Crimea: Simferopol Airport, Mega-Terminal! Interviews! Exclusive Footage!

Crimea: Simferopol Airport’s Mega New Terminal! Exclusive Report

Simferopol Airport! Crimea!! New Mega Terminal – Visualisation, Exclusive Footage!

 More coming from Crimea soon! 

‘Friends of Crimea’ – International Forum, Conference in Crimea – a few words

It’s not often that I go to forums, conferences, etc, however I made an exception for the recent ‘Friends of Crimea’ forum in Yalta, about Crimea in the international context, held on 6th and 7th November here.

I went simply as an invited guest, taking a few photos along the way (here), listening all day to the speeches, discussions, plenaries, and more. I can only impart positive take-aways from the event, which attracted 90 guests, from 30 countries.

Albeit there were no official, as in government-sent delegations, there were plenty of politicians, political figures, journalists, businessmen and in general, interesting people. Looking through the sheaf of business cards I collected at the event, there are those from Serbia, Sweden, India, and more. Actually there were two other guests from the UK too.

The day itself, actually there were two days – the first official reception, conferences, plenaries, the second excursions around Crimea, which for all the will in the world, I was unable to make due to having video edits to work on – the results of which you’ll be seeing very soon. Anyway, without wishing to brown-nose anyone in any way, the event was excellent. Really of the highest order, great hotel, atmosphere, proper top brass reception, with the Prime Minister and most all high-ranking Crimean politicians present, giving speeches, at the legendary Livadia Palace, home to the original Yalta Conference, no less.

What was achieved? Well the event gained extensive coverage in Russian media, but it must be said was not hugely covered by western. However, a group called ‘Friends of Crimea’ has now been founded, with plans to develop the forum, and hold it on yearly basis, along with other events to bring the reality of Crimea to a wider western audience, from those who’ve actually come to see it for themselves, rather than through the prism of all the propaganda surrounding Crimea.

Actually, speaking to guests there, with the atmosphere friendly, and open, for many of them it was indeed their first time on the peninsula. Impressions were across the board positive, despite this being an autumn in which there’s even snow on the mountains around Yalta, rather than the sun-drenched beaches one would more commonly associate with Crimea, with guests particularly citing the warm welcome extended to them by Crimeans.

On a personal note, I was happy to see some colleagues I’d not seen for quite some time, covering the event, and meet some interesting new people, who had some interesting proposals for areas of reportage. The day was extremely productive, engaging, and positive.

Of course, however, you can’t quite let it pass by without the irony that all the people who should have been there, who would have been more than warmly received, sat it out and would rather watch on from a distance passing off distance disinformation and propaganda.

Of course Ukraine did what they could to try to wreck the event, putting political pressure on those attending, but it didn’t have any discernible effect on the day.

But, that’s the world we live in. However, there is something to be said for those being there being those who actually wanted to come, rather than were sent, and, as I say, 90 guests from 30 countries and the biggest international event held in Crimea since reunification with Russia, are reasons to be cheerful!

Artek, Crimea – Reality vs BBC Propaganda

In my new, upcoming special reportage, I’ll be having a look at a BBC propaganda piece about Artek, the largest children’s centre in the world, in Crimea –

And how this compares with reality! I’ve already covered Artek here –

So look out for more to come, and a closer look at how the BBC ‘work’….

Our big-scale Humanitarian Distribution in Donbass

We did a distribution of humanitarian aid yesterday donated by people all over Russia, all over the DPR. A kind lady, Dasha (and I’ll mention here the help of Sean Taylor) got involved, so it got quite big scale, electrical appliances, wood, and more and went to places most in need – from Novoazovsk to Yasinovataya, to centres educating, caring for, and inspiring children here in Donbass.

I’m in the DPR for a few days, doing some more humanitarian work, then another working trip to Crimea. Sad to report that in the DPR, shelling goes on, in fact even as we were leaving Yasinvataya, early evening, it started, and by all accounts went on through the night. A young man was killed by Ukrainian shelling of Donetsk yesterday.

On a more positive note, thanks all those who made big-scale help to places for kids in the DPR today possible! I don’t collect financial donations for this, as sadly that simply leaves one open to allegations which, although they may be entirely untrue, are something I could do without, to focus fully on my work.

However, if you have items to donate, let me know, and I’ll think what we can do.

Crimea Bridge: A Real Exclusive, and more to come!!


As a journalist, of course, there are few bigger thrills than a real exclusive.

So recently, I was delighted to present you with an absolute exclusive from the Crimea Bridge, as the first western journalist there since the arches were installed!

Here, my special reportage on the bridge longer than Europe’s longest bridge – 

And here, a look at the bridge in more detail, with some surprising aspects to the mega-construction –

Some extras, here, a preview – 

Exclusive 360-degree footage –

There will be another exclusive report to come from the Crimea Bridge. And remember that all my journalism is 100% independent, crowdfunded. To be a part of making it happen, click here. 

Sochi Youth Festival and the Missing Western Media

Last week, the southern Russian city of Sochi hosted the World Festival of Youth and Students, with 25,000+ participants (a new record), and some 5000 volunteers, from 180 countries across the world taking part, in this epic event.

The regional part of the youth festival ran from October 14th to 17th, in 15 Russian regions, during which delegations visited 15 cities where participants took part in wide-ranging discussion, cultural and sports programs.

President Putin was there, speaking English even, there were concerts, mass events, and more.  All in all, it seems to have been an epic event. I was sorry not to be able to cover it myself, but, committed to Crimea, and finishing my film, it just wasn’t possible. I was more sorry upon learning that seemingly not one other western correspondent had made the perfectly accessible journey to Sochi – a 2 and a bit hour flight from Moscow.

And we all know there is a veritable mass of western correspondents in Moscow. Because they all, for want of a better expression, crawl out from under their stone whenever opposition figure Alexei Navalny (maximum of 10% in the ratings, btw, despite the 100% positive western media coverage) so much as blows his nose. His gatherings typically have about 100 attendees, and 100 western correspondents covering them.

Yet Sochi, seemingly, with little prospect of finding anything negative to report there, the masses of Moscow-based western correspondents clearly didn’t deem it worth the plane fare. I can only apologise again myself for not going, if I’d really thought that not one western correspondent would go to cover this, I’dve had to go. But, live and learn, in this case not to expect even the minimum of the western press in covering Russia.

Brit in Crimea – Filming Complete

Happy to say that on my recent trip to Crimea, I completed filming for the film some of you contributed to making – A Brit in Crimea. Huge thanks to all of you who contributed to the crowdfunding to make this film, to make it possible. 

crim

Fair to say that crowdfunding hasn’t covered costs, but I’ve gone ahead, and made the film anyway – keeping you updated along the way, on what will be my first feature presentation in English! Work began on it back in 2016, and the film will be a look at events in Crimea, from 2014 to 2017, with a unique adventure at its core!

The premiere will be in Moscow in January, and you are all cordially invited! More details of that to come!